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cleaning used carbon air filter?

carbon cleaning filter carbon with farty bits

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#1 duke

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 05:14 PM

hi all well anyone who has read my threads/diaries etc will be aware i hate waste and spending money more than i have to but being a security minded type i like to keep good filtration in my grows and need zero smells but being poor i have as you may remember been refilling the rhino cfs using new carbon from greens this is cheaper than new cf but still an expense i could do without so with the idea of cleaning and reusing the same filter medium is very appealing to me so i have been testing the theory recently using some 4/5 inch used for 2/3 year on average cfs some (the previously refilled) have screws holding then together so easy to remove carbon and clean in a large sieve by passing water through hot as you can with a drop or 2 of fairy liquid then i spread the carbon out in the shed to dry for a week or so refilled and fitted the 4inch to my smaller drobe with the flowering and very smelly tangerine dream been a few days and zero smells in drobe room!

so armed with this knowledge i did the 5 inch without taking it apart just as in this article a bucket and soapy water and a good lot of shaking and finish by rinse with clean water till it runs clean out the filter and best way is if possible just hang it in a warm room and leave to air dry and shall be testing it out next run but if this even just extends time needed between purchasing new cfs then a godsend to us poorer folks! have a look here,

https://itstillruns....er-5132511.html

i be interested to hear thoughts?peace


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#2 Anonymiss

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 05:42 PM

This sounds like it might clean the carbon of dust and other airborne residues, as the topic title suggests, which might well help with airflow, and it shows the importance of using a clean and effective pre-filter, but it won't reactivate the carbon, and any chemicals used will probably be at least partially adsorbed.

Reactivating usually involves high temperatures (800°C to 900°C) and controlled atmospheres, which are generally beyond the capabilities of most end users.
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#3 bigbadbillybob

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 10:52 PM

I was  also under the belief that they needed huge temperatures to re-activate the carbon.

I would stick with re-filling with fresh carbon Duke, security first, and after a while its easy to go "nose blind" with cannabis smells


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#4 bigbadbillybob

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 11:01 PM

I know its unlikely that you have one lying around, but  a blow torch could get over 1000 degrees which would be enough to re-activate it, but might cost more for the gas than the carbon would cost.

ive also got no idea how long it would have to be heated for to reactivate it.

i know a domestic oven wont get hot enough.#

 

just a thought


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#5 duke

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 11:05 PM

This sounds like it might clean the carbon of dust and other airborne residues, as the topic title suggests, which might well help with airflow, and it shows the importance of using a clean and effective pre-filter, but it won't reactivate the carbon and any chemicals used will probably be at least partially adsorbed.

Reactivating usually involves high temperatures (800°C to 900°C) and controlled atmospheres, which are generally beyond the capabilities of most end users.

 

hi missy my theory is only that a theory but here the air is very dusty indeed and even with good prefilter the carbon is getting blocked with crap before it is worn out so i thought cleaning the carbon of all the dust may give a bit longer useful lifespan and save me expense for a little longer each time but i have new carbon filled one on standby just incase,peace

I was  also under the belief that they needed huge temperatures to re-activate the carbon.

I would stick with re-filling with fresh carbon Duke, security first, and after a while its easy to go "nose blind" with cannabis smells

hi billy as i said its an experiment just to see if im right and the dust is the cause of the early demise of the cf in my drobes as some fail after as little as 9 months and they are rhino pro cfs so should in theory do a year minimum,i have a sniffer dog though shouldnt call her that believe me i soon hear when smells escape the drobe room from my tina!peace


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#6 Anonymiss

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 11:22 PM

I know its unlikely that you have one lying around, but  a blow torch could get over 1000 degrees which would be enough to re-activate it, but might cost more for the gas than the carbon would cost.

 
I reckon it'd catch fire way below that sort of temperature!

It's probably why they use inert atmospheres, and it would probably be tricky to do at home.
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#7 no1

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 11:36 PM

How about throwing some baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) on the rinsed clean charcoal, let it soak a minute or 3 then rinse. I'm high ...

 

Good that you have a good sniffer onsite @duke, I'm very noseblind myself,      :)       lol  @bigbadbillybob          :lol:

 

 

I think it would burn at hi temps also @Anonymiss


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#8 igiggle

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 02:57 PM

 

It's probably why they use inert atmospheres, and it would probably be tricky to do at home.

Just throwing outa thought. 
What if the carbon were put in a Pyrex dish and microwaved? Could the contamination elements be excited sufficient to decompose? Prob not.

 

When I was running sketchy, The initial outlay was pricey but I used a ion generator in the room and vented into a common attic space. No one seamed to notice. Not that the residents would have turned me in but my popularity would have increased. Anyway I used it for a couple of years with no maintenance expense.


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#9 Anonymiss

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 04:21 PM

Just throwing outa thought. 
What if the carbon were put in a Pyrex dish and microwaved? Could the contamination elements be excited sufficient to decompose? Prob not.

 
I doubt it would get hot enough, and that if it did, it would catch fire.

Wiki says...

"The most common regeneration technique employed in industrial processes is thermal reactivation. The thermal regeneration process generally follows three steps:
  • Adsorbent drying at approximately 105 °C (221 °F)
  • High temperature desorption and decomposition (500–900 °C (932–1,652 °F)) under an inert atmosphere
  • Residual organic gasification by a non-oxidising gas (steam or carbon dioxide) at elevated temperatures (800 °C (1,470 °F))"

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#10 Anonymiss

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 04:28 PM

hi missy my theory is only that a theory but here the air is very dusty indeed and even with good prefilter the carbon is getting blocked with crap before it is worn out so i thought cleaning the carbon of all the dust may give a bit longer useful lifespan and save me expense for a little longer each time but i have new carbon filled one on standby just incase,peace

 
It may well help with airborne dirt such as dust and grime :)

If your water is hard (or perhaps if it's anything other than very soft) then maybe doing the final rinse with deionised or distilled (expensive!) water might be a good idea, to prevent calcium and other minerals or carbonates being left behind and blocking the pores of the carbon?
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